Issues with CS1201 Knit Block

ETA: I wore this T-shirt half a morning and decided the sleeves were too tight. I turned them into quarter sleeves; laundered and placed my new summer T in with the other summer clothes. It is not a loss; a wadder; a big mistake. I still have a pretty, wearable garment. I just can’t wear it until late Spring. The pattern absolutely needs to altered with ease added from elbow to wrist. 

The biggest issue by far, is the rounding of my back and increased shoulder slope. They go hand in hand or at least correcting one seems to affect the other. I knew I needed to increase the back shoulder slope. Unfortunately it needs to be different amounts for each shoulder. (3/4″ right shoulder; 1/2″ left shoulder).  More critically is that the slope cannot be increased evenly.  I mean I can’t make a mark 1/2″ and then draw a line up to the shoulder point.  My shoulders have distinct angles and have double angles:

shoulderslope_resize

Maintaining the 1/2″ seam allowance, I tried offsetting the back shoulder 3/4″ at the armscye zeroing at about half way. Did the same on the right except it was offset 3/4″.

dscn7359_resize dscn7360_resize

Above: shoulders basted after offsetting for shoulder slope.

While the remaining diagonals and scoops disappeared across the back and below the shoulders, the back crept upward, easily visible from the front on both sides

backu3_resize

as well as the side views;

backuright2_resize

My first thought, well was that I didn’t smooth everything into place. When that didn’t work, I thought maybe that 1/4″ tuck on the tissue removed too much ease.  I let out the center back seam as far as possible. Nope. Didn’t help. Not one iota.

Letting out the shoulder seams was a dumb idea and didn’t work either.  So I look around and think, ” where can I sew a wedge that will remove those drag lines?”    A few of the drag lines are just below the bust most are higher.  I didn’t think a wedge below the waist would help. Didn’t think just above the waist would help either.  Between underarm and bust dart did occur to me, but I really don’t have much length in that area.  The only logical place to me was the armscye. I opted to make a wedge 1″ above the cross back. Which worked perfectly  (the shoulders hug my own) but looked wonky.

back3_resize

I’ve never seen a dart in a back armscye.  Seen lots of yokes but just a dart? No. Never that I can recall.  I decided to stitch the wedges (one for each side) permanently and join them with a very narrow tuck (less than 1/8″). The result:

backfinal_resize

I dislike adding prominent lines on-the-fly like this.  I prefer to make such things on the tissue and cut while the fabric is flat. I’m pretty sure that I made the right amount of adjustment, but because I was fussing, trying to smooth out fabric, the right wedge was placed lower than the left. Which resulted in the slanted line above.

I may still have an issue lower down where drag lines typical of needed RBA have developed:

rbalines_resize

I question that because the lines were not there before hemming:

beforehem_resize

Also, I made a 1/4″, then 1/2″ and finally 3/4″ RBA on the woven sloper. The woven sloper showed no improvement with the 3/4″ RBA; only the 1/4 and 1/2″. Seemed at the time, that a 1/2″ RBA was the right choice. I made the RBA on the cross back line. Should it have been made further down?

Further considering the wedges, I wonder if the issue at the shoulder seam/back neck was due to the 1/2″ seam allowance.  I know for a fact that I can easily join 1/4″ seam allowances where a 1/2″ in the same place would have been a struggle.  I was reluctant to trim the shoulder seam allowances to 1/4″.  Maybe I should have been bolder.

Converting the wedges to a yoke has lots of possibilities since a yoke could be placed anywhere along the armscye although I probably should adjust the sleeve cap as well. (I didn’t this time. I eased the sleeve into the armscye. 1/4″ seam allowances helped with that.) Not sure that I want the yoke to be as low or lower than the front bust. I’m afraid that would require adjusting the side seams and hem.   I wonder if the wedges can be combined with the RBA.  Fit for Art recommends making the RBA and rotating to the neckline. That works, but I’d rather sew a single back seam than 2 darts.  I’d also prefer a single yoke seam to the 4-square thingy I’ve got up above.  I wonder if the wedges which are already noted on the pattern:

dscn7375_resize

could be slashed 2″ (the length needed for the shoulder) and overlapped?  No the slash would have to go all the way across the back or I would have bubble. But I don’t want it to go all the way across because it would offset the RBA some.

The FRONT caused me only slight concern and that was the bust dart. Bit by the issue on the woven sloper, I cut a big box along the side seam at the end of the dart instead of cutting exactly on the lines. During fitting I carefully draped the bust dart; trimmed the seam allowances to 1/2″ and transferred the change to the pattern. Glad I did that because I added a bunch of fabric.  See the purple ink below:

dscn7374_resize

All added fabric during fitting.  I’m just a mess at folding out a nice bust dart on tissue!

Ah, time to think.

 

********** I may update this post as I find other options.

 

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Issues with CS1201 Knit Block

  1. I qm thinking these knits are looking good, but your unevn shoulders seem to cause those lines. Your perseverence is amazing.

    Karendee

    Like

    1. It should be a matter of altering the right side differently from the left.

      I love beefy knits for the winter. Sweaters outside, yes but cushy knits inside since DH is a walking furnace and Iam an ice cube.

      Thanks for compliments and encouragement. See you back on SG

      bev

      Like

Comment?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s